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More rain!

It's raining again today, same as yesterday, and as heavy as it was last Wednesday. This is majorly of the good. It's going to take many more days such as this until it's actually healed the long, long, long dry spell, but it's SO nice to see things like the Salt River actually being a river (and not the "Tempe Town Lake"). And of course, after ten years of drought and unbelievable population growth, the Valley is filled with thousands and thousands of people who don't seem to understand that those washes and dips in the roads weren't put there for aesthetics. Arizona washes laugh at these newfangled SUVs; they showed two of them stalled out in only a foot of water crossing 48th Street down in Ahwatukee.

Best yet, this storm is putting snow by the yard in the high country, which is MUCH better for drought relief. Last week's storms were warmer and the high country got a lot of rain, which washed off much of the early season snow pack and flooded Oak Creek, which really freaked all those desert newcomers who apparently didn't realize the height markers on the creek bridges actually meant something. I felt some amount of pity for people whose houses were flooded in Sedona, but much less for the ones who built right on the edges of the creek. Us natives have been warning "it's a river when it floods" for a decade now.

I really need to get more sleep.

And to go all Bridget-Jonesy: Weight 175 lbs. (I gained about four pounds over the holidays, which is better than it could have been.) Did a full workout yesterday. Good start.

Oh, yeah. Baseball moment: The Diamondbacks have traded Randy Johnson to the Yankees. I hate this town. :P

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
fenchurche
Jan. 4th, 2005 03:06 pm (UTC)
I felt some amount of pity for people whose houses were flooded in Sedona, but much less for the ones who built right on the edges of the creek. Us natives have been warning "it's a river when it floods" for a decade now.

During this last visit to Utah, rackham and I were marvelling at all the new housing developments scattered across the middle of Utah Valley. I was pretty puzzled by this... I've only been in and around Utah for the past fifteen or so years, but Rackham grew up there, so I asked him "Isn't that, you know, THE flood plain?" and got an enthusiastic "Oh, yeah" in reply.

You've got a large valley, connected to a larger valley to the north (Salt Lake Valley)... there's a large lake in the middle of each valley, Utah Lake and the Great Salt Lake, connected by a river. People have *always* lived on the benches around the valley, in order to avoid the water. Now they're right up to the edge of the water. If they ever get a decent amount of water there (along the lines of the flooding in the early '80s -- Rackham remembers going out with his dad to help put sandbags along the edge of State Street to create a "river" to direct the water through town), it's going to get nasty.

And, like you, I'll probably feel some pity for the people who lose their houses, but not much... because that's what you get when you build on a friggin' flood plain that was underwater as little as 20 years ago.
wildrider
Jan. 5th, 2005 03:52 am (UTC)
Yeah, that's about the size of it. They were talking about an entire mobile home park that had to be evacuated because... it's a the flood plain. Just because there's been a drought in Arizona doesn't mean the water won't come BACK.
typographer
Jan. 4th, 2005 09:46 pm (UTC)
When I was, um, 13? 12? my folks bought their first real plot of land. In the flood plain of the White River in the town where I was born. And they had a lot of gravel and dirt hauled in and raised the level of our property two feet about the plain, which is what the road was at, and where several existing house were. Every spring, the lots around ours and the alley had about six inches of standing water. And we didn't. Okay, fine.

Then one day I asked Dad, "What happens if most of the rest of the lots and fields around here are built in like ours and everyone raises their property 2 feet? The water's gotta go somewhere. Won't we flood then?"

Dad's answer: "I expect by then we'll move somewhere else."

Yeah, after selling the property to some poor sucker. *sigh*
wildrider
Jan. 5th, 2005 03:54 am (UTC)
We always lived in solid houses built in reasonably high places so I could always watch the streets turn into rivers, but the water never came inside -- same here as it was in the house I grew up in. Just a few blocks below us here there's a street that does turn into a river whenever it rains hard.
sillymagpie
Jan. 4th, 2005 11:24 pm (UTC)
Arizona washes laugh at these newfangled SUVs; they showed two of them stalled out in only a foot of water crossing 48th Street down in Ahwatukee.

Okay, I know it's bad to laugh at other peoples' misery, but... BWAHAHA! Geez, you'd think folks believed the TV commercials showing that their SUVs can do anything. Silly, silly people.

Evidently some people in Punkin Center attempted to cross a flooded stream in a backhoe. Most of them died. They probably figured a big, heavy vehicle could make it--not counting on what fast-moving water can do.

I felt some amount of pity for people whose houses were flooded in Sedona, but much less for the ones who built right on the edges of the creek. Us natives have been warning "it's a river when it floods" for a decade now.

Oak Creek Canyon is filled with boulders: Boulders that were thrown there by the creek. I remember one person from Sedona telling me that after one particularly nasty flood, there were boulders tangled in the trees. You don't play tiddlywinks with something that powerful.

I do think that people buying land in the flood plain should be warned in advance. As matters stand, I think buyers have to figure that out for themselves. Easy for me to see that a house built right next to a picturesque wash is in immediate danger of flooding, but someone from back East might not know any better.
wildrider
Jan. 5th, 2005 03:56 am (UTC)
I suppose them out-of-staters can't be blamed. Someone undoubtedly sold them that property knowing full well what Oak Creek could do.

Still, I know plenty of people from other states who have similar tales of homes built on flood plains, so it should be fairly common knowledge. Fellow we knew in Michigan told us about the house on the flood plain that got flooded and then FROZEN in, so they couldn't even continue to canoe out. People is just odd... Or stubborn. :)
( 6 comments — Leave a comment )

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