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The Celebration of Ignorance and Bullies

Even as they struggle to push through legislation to curb bullies in the schoolyard (yes, that'll help kids behave better), and fight to make people {think like us} kinder and gentler and more, um, "compassionate," as well as "protecting the Homeland," and goodness, keep the right of marriage away from a percentage of the community because we're skeered of 'em, whatdoyaknow, terrorists are allowed to buy guns (including assault rifles) because we don't want to infringe on the rights of innocent gun owners, and we're gonna appoint a guy as envoy to the United Nations who believes "Treaties are 'law' only for U.S. domestic purposes. In their international operations, treaties are simply 'political' obligations" and "If I were redoing the Security Council today, I'd have one permanent member because that's the real reflection of the distribution of power in the world. . . The United States" and this gem, "Support for the International Criminal Court concept is based largely on emotional appeals to an abstract ideal of an international judicial system unsupported by any meaningful evidence and running contrary to sound principles of international crisis resolution."

Whee!

The United States is Nelson Muntz. We point at the rest of the world and go, "Ha ha!"

Comments

( 19 comments — Leave a comment )
nutmeg3
Mar. 9th, 2005 02:42 pm (UTC)
This new UN guy scares me. Nothing good can come from this. I'm only half-joking when I say I may not come back from NZ. Add a handsome and available sheep farmer to my vacation and I'm there for-fuckin'-ever. Because the legacy of Bush's choices in so many arenas will be with us forever, and I'm not sure I want to live with the consequences.
wildrider
Mar. 9th, 2005 11:58 pm (UTC)
I know what you mean. If it weren't for Australian friends warning they're having their right-wing-in-the-sun problems, too, that'd be one of the places I'd aim for (largely because the climate in Queensland is similar to Arizona, and I stand a chance of getting Barb there -- otherwise, I'd be aiming at Canada).

I want to know what the hell happened to my country. I'm certain this is not what they had in mind when they founded her, no matter how right the right thinks it is.
sillymagpie
Mar. 10th, 2005 12:43 am (UTC)
The "Might Makes Right"-Wing
You and me both. As I've mentioned, if Daddy had moved to Australia as he wanted when he was a young man, I'd be the daughter of an Aussie farmer. And I do like the way Queensland looks, I very much do. But right-wing idjits seem to be in ascendancy there, too.
nutmeg3
Mar. 10th, 2005 01:14 am (UTC)
<< I want to know what the hell happened to my country. I'm certain this is not what they had in mind when they founded her, no matter how right the right thinks it is. >>

For one thing, they seem to have forgotten that it was founded to ensure religious freedom (imo with the attendant freedom to define morality by a varying set of lights), not to quash it.
wildrider
Mar. 10th, 2005 01:38 am (UTC)
Oh, yes. And every time someone points out that many of the founding fathers weren't exactly all that devout, they come back with that absurd "this country was founded as a Christian nation!" {sigh} I sometimes wish those sorts would drop the "Christian" part, since I don't think they are. They're really kinda Jewish, pure fundamentalist Jewish (the Five Books of Moses rule all), who just wear crosses.
nutmeg3
Mar. 10th, 2005 02:44 am (UTC)
I dunno. We have our own fundamentalists (the various varieties of Hassidim), and true Judaism has a lot more humanity in it than "they" demonstrate. I'm not quite sure where their religion really comes from. The worst of all worlds, I suppose, taking whatever supports their position out of context and cobbling together something no real religion ever intended.
wildrider
Mar. 10th, 2005 05:07 am (UTC)
Yeah, that's why I said "kinda," because it doesn't ring true there (I dabbled in Judaism in High School for a time). Just that so many of them lean very heavily on the Old Testament, when Jesus specifically said he was going to throw it out and start fresh with the new. Very few people who espouse these right-wing, fundamentalist views ever seem to actually know what Jesus SAID, like explaining that breaking the Commandments was okay in the name of compassion. Stuff like that. :P (I'm willing to bet that these fundie "Christians" who condemn gay marriage as a "sin" due to Leviticus line up at the all-you-can-eat shrimp buffet.)

I've wandered through many of the "isms" and by and large what I love most about spirituality/religion are things like love, compassion, understanding, and the honest belief that there is Something Higher Than Us. I wandered back to Catholicism not because of the dogma (rather in spite of it), but because it was the comforting religion I was raised in and I know the proper responses. But I certainly don't like the Mother Church's 3rd Century attitude toward, well, everything.
nutmeg3
Mar. 11th, 2005 02:00 am (UTC)
<< I wandered back to Catholicism not because of the dogma (rather in spite of it), but because it was the comforting religion I was raised in and I know the proper responses. But I certainly don't like the Mother Church's 3rd Century attitude toward, well, everything. >>

So it's sort of like the baby-eating alien you know.... ::ducking::
wildrider
Mar. 11th, 2005 03:01 am (UTC)
Yeah, that's it. :)
sillymagpie
Mar. 10th, 2005 12:40 am (UTC)
Because the legacy of Bush's choices in so many arenas will be with us forever, and I'm not sure I want to live with the consequences.

That's what scares me, too, nutmeg3. :-(
nutmeg3
Mar. 10th, 2005 01:16 am (UTC)
And I know we're far from alone in feeling this way, so why the frilly heck didn't people come out in November to vote their convictions (and, frankly, their fears)?
wildrider
Mar. 10th, 2005 01:48 am (UTC)
We, the hurting and intelligent 49%, did. We just weren't strong enough. And too many people voted for the baby-eating alien they knew rather than the guy they didn't (

And while I'm thinking about it,
this one...
Oh, and this one, too.
wildrider
Mar. 10th, 2005 01:50 am (UTC)
There's three links up there, and I don't know why the first two are stuck together. The first one is:
http://www.idrewthis.org/2004/babyeating.html

The second one is:
http://www.idrewthis.org/2004/bushkerry.html

nutmeg3
Mar. 10th, 2005 02:49 am (UTC)
Those were good. And the baby-eating alien one realy does ring true, just based on the comments of some Bush voters I know. But also, there were just too many people who didn't vote. Maybe they thought it was hopeless, I don't know, but it still upsets me.
sillymagpie
Mar. 10th, 2005 05:51 am (UTC)
What I don't understand is not having a strong enough opinion to vote in this election. Who sat back and said, "Meh. Bush, Kerry -- what's the difference?"
sillymagpie
Mar. 10th, 2005 05:36 am (UTC)
49% of us did. Unfortunately, 51% appear to be living in a bubble of cluelessness. :-(
nutmeg3
Mar. 11th, 2005 02:02 am (UTC)
And then there's the 50% of the country living in a bubble of who-the-hell-cares-think-I'll-have-me-another-beer-and-screw-that-voting-crap. They're the ones I hate most of all.
sillymagpie
Mar. 11th, 2005 04:18 am (UTC)
I honestly don't understand them at all. :-(
sillymagpie
Mar. 10th, 2005 12:39 am (UTC)
Ooog. And I thought my head was hurting before I read this. Geez, who are these people?
( 19 comments — Leave a comment )

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